Archive for the ‘Movement training’ Category

More on Body Tension

Friday, November 30th, 2012
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Movement Terms

Sorry that I have been silent lately. Going into the Thanks Giving holiday I got really disorganized and stopped making time to blog. Anyway lets get back to body tension.  This is a video I made that provides a number of basic joint actions and the vocabulary used to describe them. I am putting this up now because I think it will make understanding the video analysis of body tension a lot easier.

Basic Movement Terms

Some may ask why we need to know and use such a specialized language. The first answer is because it’s far easier than the alternative in which people just make up their own terms and there is no precise and universal way to talk about body movement. Second this language is very helpful in a variety of settings such as when talking to sports doctors concerning injuries or movement problems. If you can describe what causes pain in these terms it will be easier for a professional to understand what you are telling them.   Finally, correctly understanding and labeling movement is the way we accurately identify what muscles contribute to that movement which is necessary for a number of reasons including movement analysis and the development of conditioning programs.

Concerning further posts on body tension I am taking g’s suggestion of sub categories seriously and I think its possible to describe perhaps three subcategories so I am working on these descriptions and hope to have them completed soon.

Routecrafter’s Post on Body Tension

Monday, October 15th, 2012
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I am so glad that JF, the author of the Routecrafter blog, posted in the comments on this blog because that allowed me to find his blog. I really enjoy his thoughtful analysis of the topics he writes about. I wish there were more blogs like it. Here is a link to a post from Oct. 8 that I just saw. He picks up the discussion we’ve been having here and addresses it from a course setters perspective.  I think this would be a good read for anyone who competes.  Enjoy.

Route Setting Tips and Techniques: Defining Body Tension

First Stab at Defining Body Tension

Thursday, October 11th, 2012
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Things have been very busy so I have not had much time to dedicate to writing this week so this can hardly be considered a complete post (sorry!). Anyway I think a number of the comments on the previous post described salient features of body tension, and got at how and why body tension is difficult to define. For my part, I want to take a step back and start with three important basic points: (more…)

Body Tension: What is it anyway?

Thursday, October 4th, 2012
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I actually started this series of posts out of order by describing the joint actions and muscles at work in the front lever, an exercise often described as an excellent way of developing body tension. But I didn’t define what body tension is. We are looking for a functional definition, one that is (more…)

Our First Audio Interview: Dr. Don Reagan

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012
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This is the first installment of my interview with Dr. Don Reagan. Dr. Reagan has worked with Athletes around the country  he is Head Performance Coach and Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) at the Orthopaedic Center of Central Virginia as well as Adjunct Professor of Strength & Conditioning at Liberty University. He integrates rehabilitation and athletic development for the betterment of his clientele using Functional Movement Systems. He is also an ardent student of manual therapy and pain science. He has over 10 years of experience in the fitness industry, and has competed in strength sports including Olympic Weightlifting and Power Lifting.

Dan and I met Dr. Reagan over dinner in 2011 and had a great conversation. I wanted to share some Dr. Reagan’s views with our readers and he was kind enough to agree to an interview. One of the things that is most interesting about Dr. Reagan is that he participates in strength sports but he places significant emphasis on movement. Our conversation covered a number of topics from movement, to the state of sports science today, to how best to think about injury prevention. We pick up our conversation with Dr. Reagan describing the idea of global movement.  the rest of the installments of our conversation will be posted in the days to come.

 

here is the link: Don Reagan Interview Part 1.mov – YouTube

 

Let us know how you like the interview and the addition of audio to the blog!

Case Study: Climber X part 3

Thursday, November 17th, 2011
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The goal of our last working session was to piece together a training plan for X. Before launching into our plan, let’s summarize what we discovered the two previous days. First, X’s strengths are

  • Physical: stamina
  • Movement: turning
  • Hold type: crimps
  • Solid route pyramid topping out at 11d
(more…)

Effective and Efficient Movement – Pt 2

Monday, October 25th, 2010
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In the previous installment, I discussed three of six important elements to effective and efficient climbing. Here’s what I said last time, it’s worth repeating here:

Effective and efficient, that’s your goal. Effectiveness yields results without regard for the effort necessary; it’s simply defined as success. Efficiency is not concerned with success but rather the ease with which each particular movement can be performed. Both are necessary. Effectiveness without efficiency means wasted effort as you muscle your way through sequences; you can never climb to your potential without being efficient. Efficiency without effectiveness yields failure; for example, the easiest way to complete a sequence might put you in a poor position for the next set of moves.

4. Dynamic movement

Dynamic movement is often the easiest way to reach your next hold.

Number four on my list is moving using momentum. New climbers can erroneously come to see slow, static movement as desirable. It looks graceful and controlled, but it’s not always the easiest way to get from hold A to hold B. Sometimes properly applied momentum can carry you over a difficult move with much less effort than locking off one hold while you slowly reach for the next.

Learn to use momentum by first moving both hands simultaneously from one hold to another on a vertical wall. Use large holds and feel how moving your hips can affect the feel and effectiveness of the momentum. As you get better extend the throw then try moving a single hand instead of both better known in climbing circles as a deadpoint.

5. Specialized technique

At some point you’ll need to incorporate specific types of movement skills into your repertoire. Let’s discuss what’s probably the most utilized of these special techniques: the heel hook. (more…)

The Keys to Effective, Efficient Climbing Movement

Thursday, September 30th, 2010
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Effective and efficient, that’s your goal. Effectiveness yields results without regard for the effort necessary; it’s simply defined as success. Efficiency is not concerned with success but rather the ease with which each particular movement can be performed. Both are necessary. Effectiveness without efficiency means wasted effort as you muscle your way through sequences; you can never climb to your potential without being efficient. Efficiency without effectiveness yields failure; for example, the easiest way to complete a sequence might put you in a poor position for the next set of moves.

I’ve found through observation, study, and trial and error, that there are six primary determinants of effective and efficient movement. Today we’ll go over the first three. I’ll publish the second three in a week or so.

1. Precise feet

Precise foot placement is the first order of business in climbing efficiency.

Number one is always precise foot placement. If you’re climbing near your limit on holds that you can barely use, you better not waste any time placing your feet. You simply must get your foot quickly and precisely to the exact spot it’s needed without adjustment or delay. Any extra time spent bumping your foot around a hold means you’re extending the time that you’re exerting tremendous effort using those poor hand holds.

The silent foot exercise is the best way to improve foot placement precision. You attempt to climb without making any noise with your feet. It’s easier said than done and requires concentrated effort over an extended period of time. Begin on an easy climb and go slow, as you get better increase both your speed and the difficulty of the climbing until you can move at your normal pace on difficult terrain and still place your feet precisely.

2. Turning

Number two on my list is turning. There is no substitute for the leverage that turning side-to-side in appropriate circumstances provides. Turning helps you use the big, powerful muscles of your core and upper back rather than the much weaker biceps to reach the next hold. (more…)